Entomostraca

Definitions

  • Entomostraca
    Entomostraca
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Entomostraca in some older classifications includes the Branchiopoda and Copepoda and Ostracoda and Cirripedia; no longer in technical use
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n. pl Entomostraca (Zoöl) One of the subclasses of Crustacea, including a large number of species, many of them minute. The group embraces several orders; as the Phyllopoda Ostracoda Copepoda, and Pectostraca. See Copepoda Phyllopoda, and Cladocera.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • entomostraca In zoology: Latreille's name for all crustaceans, except the stalk-eyed and sessile-eyed groups. It is restricted to a portion of the lower crustaceans, but the classifications vary so much that the term is gradually being abandoned. The groups usually noted by it are the Ostracoda, as Cypris; Copepoda, as Cyclops; Cladocera, as Daphnia (see Daphnia); Branchiopoda, as the brine-shrimp (Artemia salina) and the glacier-flea (Podura nivalis); Trilobites, all of which are extinct; Merostomata, of which Eurypterus and Pterygotus are the best-known examples among fossils, the king-crab being the only living example. To these some add the Epizoa, or parasitic crustaceans. No zoological definition can be framed to include all these groups, each of which is now usually regarded as a distinct order. The Entomostraca appear to have been first named by O. F. Müller in 1785, and have also been called Gnathopoda, as by H. Woodward.
    • entomostraca In various Systems, one of two main divisions of Crustacea proper (the other being Malacostraca). It is divided into Cirripedia (including Rhizocephala), Copepoda (including Siphonostoma), Ostracoda, and Branchiopoda (the latter covering both Cladocera and Phyllopoda).
    • entomostraca As restricted, defined, and retained by Huxley, those Crustacea which have not more than three maxilliform gnathites and completely specialized jaws, the abdominal segments (counting as such those which lie behind the genital aperture) devoid of appendages, if there be any abdomen, and the embryo almost always leaving the egg as a nauplius-form. Thus defined, the Entomostraca are divided into: 1, Copepoda; 2, Epizoa; 3, Branchiopoda; 4, Ostracoda; 5, Pectostraca.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n.pl Entomostraca en-to-mos′tra-ka a general name for the lower orders of crustacea—Phyllopods, Ostracods, Copepods, and Cirripedes
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL., fr. Gr. cut in pieces + burnt clay, the hard shell of Testacea
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. entomos, cut in—en, in, temnein, to cut, ostrakon, a shell.

Usage

In literature:

The bladders catch a multitude of Entomostraca, and larvae of insects.
"The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume II (of II)" by Charles Darwin
In the same plants are found curious little Entomostraca, very abundant there but found nowhere else.
"Darwinism (1889)" by Alfred Russel Wallace
NATURAL HISTORY OF THE BRITISH ENTOMOSTRACAE, by W. Baird, M.D.
"Notes and Queries, Vol. IV, Number 95, August 23, 1851" by Various
NATURAL HISTORY OF THE BRITISH ENTOMOSTRACAE, by W. Baird, M.D.
"Notes and Queries, Vol. IV, Number 96, August 30, 1851" by Various
The limbs of the post-cephalic series show little differentiation among themselves in many Entomostraca.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 7" by Various
***