Emperor-moth

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Emperor-moth except the Death's-head, the largest British moth, its expanse of wings being about three inches
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. emperere—L. imperator (fem. imperatrix)—imperāre, to command.

Usage

In literature:

She was so stunned over the loss of that moth, which she had childishly named the Yellow Emperor, that she scarcely remembered the blow.
"A Girl Of The Limberlost" by Gene Stratton Porter
The male Oak Eggar has a sumptuous pair, as has the Great Peacock or Emperor Moth.
"Social Life in the Insect World" by J. H. Fabre
The promothea moth, whose cocoons are common on lilac bushes, may be studied in the same way as the emperor.
"Ontario Teachers' Manuals: Nature Study" by Ontario Ministry of Education
The female Emperor-moth used it.
"The Promise of Air" by Algernon Blackwood
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