Dunch

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Dunch dunsh (Scot.) to push with the elbow: to gore with the horns, as a bull.
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Hardly related to Sw. dunka, to beat; Dan. dunke, a thump.

Usage

In literature:

Tom Dunch an' some of his kidney was drinkin' themselves riot-ripe when I passed along after noon.
"Rewards and Fairies" by Rudyard Kipling
I must have dunched my side Against a stone in falling ...
"Krindlesyke" by Wilfrid Wilson Gibson
Grannie Dunch believed them; but then she was very ignorant, over ninety years old, and had never been to school.
"White Lilac; or the Queen of the May" by Amy Walton
I "dunched" my brother, who lay beside me, with my elbow.
"My Lady of the Chimney Corner" by Alexander Irvine
Tom Dunch an' some of his kidney was drinkin' themselves riot-ripe when I passed along after noon.
"Rewards and Fairies" by Rudyard Kipling
On Captain John Dunch, who died in 1697, aged 67.
"Gleanings in Graveyards a collection of Curious Epitaphs" by Horatio Edward Norfolk
The mud about the gates was dunched.
"Reynard the Fox" by John Masefield
I saw Lord Dunching the other day at Wimbledon Park in a charming waistcoat.
"Mr. Punch's Golf Stories" by Various
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