Doom-palm

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Doom-palm dōōm′-päm a kind of African palm, with a branched stem, tufts of fan-shaped leaves, and a fruit as big as an apple.
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

The valley has quite a Soudan appearance, but solely on account of the presence of the doom palm.
"Narrative of a Mission to Central Africa Performed in the Years 1850-51, Volume 1" by James Richardson
Amongst the trees to-day appeared most conspicuously the doom-palm.
"Narrative of a Mission to Central Africa Performed in the Years 1850-51, Volume 2" by James Richardson
I looked up from my revery to find the eyes of both of them fixed on me as if I held their doom balanced upon my palm.
"The Thing from the Lake" by Eleanor M. Ingram
The doom palm is another species, and is remarkable for its many-forked stem.
"The World and Its People: Book VII" by Anna B. Badlam
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In poetry:

They stooped, in the gleam of the faint light, over
The print of themselves on the limpid gloom;
And she lifted her full palm toward her lover,
With her lips preparing the words of doom.
"The Well Of Saint John" by Richard Doddridge Blackmore