Dill-water

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Dill-water a stomachic and carminative
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. dile; Ger. and Sw. dill.

Usage

In literature:

The gardener was near the gate, watering the dill and parsley, the carrots and parsnips.
"The Lilac Fairy Book" by Andrew Lang
The gardener was near the gate, watering the dill and parsley, the carrots and parsnips.
"The Lilac Fairy Book" by Andrew Lang
COVER WITH WATER AND COOK WITH PLENTY OF DILL; SPRINKLE WITH A LITTLE OIL AND A TRIFLE OF SALT.
"Cooking and Dining in Imperial Rome" by Apicius
Dill-water is largely used as a carminative for children, and as a vehicle for the exhibition of nauseous drugs.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 4" by Various
Try a little magnesia, or dill water, or squills, or what you like.
"A Little World" by George Manville Fenn
Ah, it's after having dill-water ye are now, is it?
"The Flower of Forgiveness" by Flora Annie Steel
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In news:

Tim Dill of Albany floats in Puget Sound in during the water survival demonstration on the recent JCOC.
In a large saucepan combine the 3 cups water, the vinegar, pickling salt, dill, red pepper, and garlic.
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