Dight

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Dight To have sexual intercourse with. "And Adam knew Eve his wife.""And I knew that thou hearest me always.""The monk he instantly knew to be the prior.""In other hands I have known money do good."
    • Dight To prepare; to put in order; hence, to dress, or put on; to array; to adorn. "She gan the house todight.""Two harmless turtles, dight for sacrifice.""The clouds in thousand liveries dight ."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • dight To set in order; arrange; dispose.
    • dight Reflexively, to set or address.
    • dight To put into a certain condition or position.
    • dight To dispose of; treat.
    • dight To prepare; make ready.
    • dight To prepare or make ready by dressing or cooking.
    • dight To prepare or make ready by equipping or arraying; dress; equip; array; deck; adorn.
    • dight To put into the proper or any desired condition by removing obstructions or inequalities; dress; clean. specically — To dress or smooth, as a stone by chiseling or a board by planing.
    • dight By sifting or winnowing: as, to dight corn. [In sense 6, Scotch (pronounced dicht and sometimes spelled dicht) and North. Eng.]
    • dight Finely; well.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adj Dight dīt disposed, adorned
    • adv Dight finely.—Also Dight′ly
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OF. dihten, AS. dihtan, to dictate, command, dispose, arrange, fr. L. dictare, to say often, dictate, order; cf. G. dichten, to write poetry, fr. L. dictare,. See Dictate

Usage

In literature:

But when the board was dight they bade them sit down with them and eat.
"The Well at the World's End" by William Morris
On the morrow early was Jack of the Tofts dight for departure, with Christopher and David and Gilbert and five score of his best men.
"Child Christopher" by William Morris
I saw the clodhapper of a ploughman aye dighting his een with the sleeve of his big-coat.
"The Life of Mansie Wauch Tailor in Dalkeith, written by himself" by David Macbeth Moir
Wauken up, ye auld bitch, and gie this coat a dight.
"Doom Castle" by Neil Munro
Praise-dight filler of ravens, who every bay doth close, Hath out a teeming host of Danes, from the south all.
"The Sagas of Olaf Tryggvason and of Harald The Tyrant (Harald Haardraade)" by Snorri Sturluson
In a week from that the city was dight and decked for the crowning of Talisso.
"A Child's Book of Saints" by William Canton
Raise his legs as a hen, and dight his brain.
"The accomplisht cook" by Robert May
I saw the clodhapper of a ploughman aye dighting his een with the sleeve of his big-coat.
"The Life of Mansie Wauch tailor in Dalkeith" by D. M. Moir
The heavy dews are fallig fast: A fod good-dight I wish you.
"The Wit and Humor of America, Volume X (of X)" by Various
Ne'er kiss a man's wife, or dight his knife, for he'll do baith after you.
"The Proverbs of Scotland" by Alexander Hislop
Where close around the boughs of trees their quavering shadows shed, We dight the boards, and once again flame on the altars raise.
"The Æneids of Virgil" by Virgil
His dinner shall be dight!
"Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse" by Various
A worthy villain, in his mantle dight.
"Dramatic Technique" by George Pierce Baker
And thereafter he was taken out of the bath, and laid in a goodly bed which was dight right heedfully.
"Tales from the Old French" by Various
I suggested the Dight-Suttons.
"Jane Oglander" by Marie Belloc Lowndes
But the lion came at the pitch-black hour of two, and his doom was dight.
"Wild Honey" by Cynthia Stockley
Is th' Earth disrobed of her apron white, Kind Winter's guift, & in a greene one dight?
"The Complete Works of Richard Crashaw, Volume I (of 2)" by Richard Crashaw
J. Butler Dight, Robert Campbell on the Beach, John Grant, Alexander Brymer, Gerrish and Gray appear most prominent.
"History of Halifax City" by Thomas B. Akins
He has fourteen acres 'reasonably well dight to sow on wheat.
"The Paston Letters, Volume III (of 6)"
O Tree with royal purple dight!
"God Wills It!" by William Stearns Davis
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In poetry:

"Ye lie, ye lie, ye liar loud!
Sae loud I hear ye lie;
For Percy had not men yestreen,
To dight my men and me.
"Battle Of Otterbourne" by Anonymous British
O she's ta'en out her handkerchief,
It was o' the holland sae fine,
And aye she dighted her father's bloody wounds,
That were redder than the wine.
"The Douglas Tragedy" by Andrew Lang
'Tis noon — against the knotted oak
The hunters rest the idle spear;
Curls through the trees the slender smoke,
Where yeoman dight the woodland cheer.
"Cadyow Castle" by Sir Walter Scott
He put his hand on the Earlie's head;
He show'd him a rock beside the sea,
Where a king lay stiff beneath his steed,
And steel-dight nobles wiped their ee.
"Thomas the Rhymer" by Sir Walter Scott
Downward they wind from pastoral height,
Or hamlet grouped round shattered towers,
To wend to shrine more richly dight,
And bring their gift of wilding flowers;
"The Door Of Humility" by Alfred Austin
Heavily slumbered noonday bright
Upon the lone field, glory-dight,
A burnished grassy sea:
The child, in gorgeous golden hours,
Through heaven-descended starry flowers,
Went walking on the lea.
"The Child-Mother" by George MacDonald

In news:

And Mrs Kenneth Dight .
Kenneth and Jane Dight of Wellsburg will celebrate their 62nd wedding anniversary on Nov 5.
3444 Dight Ave SMinneapolis, MN 55406-2620Phone:612-721-2911, 800-533-0509Fax:612-721-1009.
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