Decuman

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adj Decuman dek′ū-man principal, large—of waves, &c.: connected with the principal gate of a Roman camp (near which the 10th cohort of the legion was stationed)
    • n Decuman a great wave, as every tenth wave was supposed to be
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

Indeed, that same decumane wave that took us fore and aft somewhat altered my pulse.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete." by Francois Rabelais
The opposite entrance was called the Decuman Gate.
"History of Rome from the Earliest times down to 476 AD" by Robert F. Pennell
Is not here the Decuman gate?
"The Antiquary, Volume 1" by Sir Walter Scott
Is not here the Decuman gate?
"The Antiquary, Complete" by Sir Walter Scott
Indeed, that same decumane wave that took us fore and aft somewhat altered my pulse.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Book IV." by Francois Rabelais
St. Neot (more probably St. Decuman, as St. Neot was not beheaded).
"Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of Wells" by Percy Dearmer
Out of the West or Decuman Gate, the Roman road to London and the North started.
"The Towns of Roman Britain" by James Oliver Bevan
Thy decuman is broken on the shore: A peer to him shall lave thee never more!
"John Patrick, Third Marquess of Bute, K.T." by David Hunter Blair
These three Decuman streets are the arteries of ancient Naples.
"Naples Past and Present" by Arthur H. Norway
At D was the Decuman gate.
"Annals of a Fortress" by E. Viollet-le-Duc
***