Cramp-iron

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Cramp-iron a piece of metal bent at both ends for binding things together
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. crampe; cf. Dut. kramp, Ger. krampf.

Usage

In literature:

Did he promise me a set of iron cramps or ties for the roof?
"Puck of Pook's Hill" by Rudyard Kipling
The box cramped round with iron was next unlocked.
"The Room in the Dragon Volant" by J. Sheridan LeFanu
Did he promise me a set of iron cramps or ties for the roof?
"Puck of Pook's Hill" by Rudyard Kipling
It is formed of large masses of squared stones, united together by cramps of iron.
"The Seven Great Monarchies Of The Ancient Eastern World, Vol 2. (of 7): Assyria" by George Rawlinson
At Smolensk he had made each workman provide himself with a tool and some cramp-irons.
"History of the Expedition to Russia" by Count Philip de Segur
Then it was that flood after flood of passionate tears seemed to remove the iron cramp which had pained his heart.
"St. Winifred's" by Frederic W. Farrar
The cramp of war was deep in us, as an iron frost in the earth.
"Tatterdemalion" by John Galsworthy
The car slid along the roof, and encountered an iron cramp.
"A Winter Amid the Ice" by Jules Verne
Over each cell a cramp-iron was fixed, wherewith to lock-up the prisoners like ferocious dogs.
"The Contemporary Review, Volume 36, September 1879" by Various
He straightened it gingerly and ironed out the cramp with the back of his gun hand.
"The Rider of Golden Bar" by William Patterson White
They have been used as a cramping iron, as a shibboleth, as a stone to fling at honest and especially at young preachers.
"The Expositor's Bible: Colossians and Philemon" by Alexander Maclaren
It was built of huge square stones, fastened together on the outside by iron and leaden cramps.
"Ruins of Ancient Cities (Vol. I of II)" by Charles Bucke
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