Cothurnus

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Cothurnus Same as Cothurn.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n cothurnus The buskin of the Greeks and Romans. It was held by the Romans to be a characteristic part of the costume of tragic actors, whence cothurnus is sometimes figuratively used for tragedy. The Greeks, however, called the shoe of tragic actors ἐΝβάς or ἐΝβατή. It is shown by monuments to have been a closed shoe, like a usual form of the hunting-buskin, but differing from this in having a very thick sole; and, like the hunting-buskin, it was probably laced high on the leg, though this is not certain. Also cothurn.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Cothurnus kō-thur′nus a buskin or high boot laced in front, worn in tragic performances.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. cothurnus—Gr. kothornos.

Usage

In literature:

She too wears the mask and the cothurnus, and speaks to measure.
"The History of Henry Esmond, Esq." by W. M. Thackeray
Is there a cothurnus in the world more tragic than these boots, whose soles are hanging out their tongues?
"Notre-Dame de Paris" by Victor Hugo
COTHURNAL, from "cothurnus," a particular boot worn by actors in Greek tragedy.
"Volpone; Or, The Fox" by Ben Jonson
COTHURNAL, from "cothurnus," a particular boot worn by actors in Greek tragedy.
"The Alchemist" by Ben Jonson
COTHURNAL, from "cothurnus," a particular boot worn by actors in Greek tragedy.
"The Poetaster" by Ben Jonson
COTHURNAL, from "cothurnus," a particular boot worn by actors in Greek tragedy.
"Sejanus: His Fall" by Ben Jonson
COTHURNAL, from "cothurnus," a particular boot worn by actors in Greek tragedy.
"Every Man In His Humor" by Ben Jonson
COTHURNUS: I never sleep.
"Aria da Capo" by Edna St. Vincent Millay
She wears the cothurnus, and her head is wreathed with vine leaves.
"Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama" by E. Cobham Brewer
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In poetry:

No false constraint be thine!
But, for right walking, choose
The fine,
The strict cothurnus, Muse.
"Art" by Alfred Noyes