Corpse-candle

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Corpse-candle a light seen hovering over a grave—an omen of death
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
M. E. corps, earlier cors—O. Fr. cors, the body—L. corpus.

Usage

In literature:

The room was growing dark, and upon the dry and rigid features of the corpse the fitful flames of the candles cast patches of light.
"Original Short Stories, Volume 2 (of 13)" by Guy de Maupassant
The room was growing dark, and upon the dry and rigid features of the corpse the fitful flames of the candles cast patches of light.
"Maupassant Original Short Stories (180), Complete" by Guy de Maupassant
The woman and her daughters lighted candles and placed them in the window recesses and at the head of the corpse.
"The King of Ireland's Son" by Padraic Colum
May be you don't believe in corpse candles.
"A Book For The Young" by Sarah French
There's the Clerk and the Corpse-candles.
"The Brownies and Other Tales" by Juliana Horatia Ewing
The doctor examined the corpse by the light of a candle.
"A Mummer's Tale" by Anatole France
A crookt corpse, yellow as his lost gold, I found him, When I fetched my candle.
"Krindlesyke" by Wilfrid Wilson Gibson
I have met with persons in various parts of Wales who told me that they had seen a corpse candle.
"Welsh Folk-Lore a Collection of the Folk-Tales and Legends of North Wales" by Elias Owen
No more corpse-candles, or that sort of thing.
"Rookwood" by William Harrison Ainsworth
Death-candle (or Corpse-candle), 10, 145, 153, 155, 207, 220-1.
"The Fairy-Faith in Celtic Countries" by W. Y. Evans Wentz
***

In poetry:

With doors ajar, and candles light,
And torches burning clear,
The streekit corpse, till still midnight,
They waked, but naething hear.
"Young Benjie" by Andrew Lang