Corking-pin

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Corking-pin a large pin, probably from fastening the hair to a pad of cork
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Sp. corcho—L. cortex, bark, rind.

Usage

In literature:

The bottom was covered with a sheet of thin cork, and on long pins sticking in it were large, velvet-winged moths.
"A Girl Of The Limberlost" by Gene Stratton Porter
They looked like two butterflies trying to pin each other to a cork.
"The Innocence of Father Brown" by G. K. Chesterton
A pin, a cork, and a card, and we add him to the Baker Street collection!
"The Hound of the Baskervilles" by A. Conan Doyle
A pin, a cork, and a card, and we add him to the Baker Street collection!
"The Hound of the Baskervilles" by Arthur Conan Doyle
A good cuff or two when he saw me pinning an insect to a cork was all the encouragement that I received from him.
"The Life of the Fly" by J. Henri Fabre
Her aunt's left-off clothes had come to her in a big roll, fastened with a corking-pin.
"Nina Balatka" by Anthony Trollope
When I took out the pins and unrolled it, it fairly popped like the cork out of a champagne bottle.
"Eighty Years And More; Reminiscences 1815-1897" by Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Butterflies, too, and beetles were obtained in great numbers, being carefully killed, and pinned out in boxes lined with camphored cork.
"Off to the Wilds" by George Manville Fenn
He had seen coiled on a belaying pin on the bridge a long lead line, and on the deck still unwashed away an old cork fender.
"Heroes of the Goodwin Sands" by Thomas Stanley Treanor
Get a cork and run three pins into the end, just like a three-legged stool.
"Practical Taxidermy" by Montagu Browne
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