Conceptacle

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Conceptacle (Bot) A pericarp, opening longitudinally on one side and having the seeds loose in it; a follicle; a double follicle or pair of follicles.
    • Conceptacle (Bot) One of the cases containing the spores, etc., of flowerless plants, especially of algae.
    • Conceptacle That in which anything is contained; a vessel; a receiver or receptacle.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n conceptacle That in which anything is contained; a vessel; a receiver or receptacle.
    • n conceptacle In botany: Originally, as used by Linnæus, a follicle—that is, a fruit formed of a single carpel dehiscing by the ventral suture.
    • n conceptacle In lower cryptogams, an organ or a cavity which incloses reproductive bodies, usually spores, with or without special spore-cases: applied without reference to the origin of the spores, whether sexual or asexual. In Sphœrioideœ (of Fungi imperfecti) the conidial spores are borne on short threads within conceptacles; in pyrenomycetous fungi the conceptacle (perithecium) contains spores in asci (thecæ); in Florideœ (red algæ) either cystocarpic spores or tetraspores may be contained in conceptacles; in Fucaceœ (rock-weeds, etc.) antheridia containing antherozoides, and oögonia containing o⊙spores, are formed in conceptacles. The sporangium, as of ferns, was formerly included under this term, but it is now rarely used in that sense. Also conceptaculum.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Conceptacle that in which anything is contained, a receptacle:
    • ns Conceptacle (bot.) a pericarp of one valve, a follicle: a cavity enclosing the reproductive cells in certain plants and animals
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. conceptaculum, fr. concipere, to receive. See Conceive
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. concipĕre, -ceptum, to conceive.

Usage

In literature:

Similar section of a sterile conceptacle, containing slender antheridia.
"The Elements of Botany" by Asa Gray
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