Caulis

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Caulis (Bot) An herbaceous or woody stem which bears leaves, and may bear flowers.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n caulis In architecture, one of the main stalks or leaves which spring from between the acanthusleaves of the second row on each side of the typical Corinthian capital, and are carried up to support the volutes at the angles. Compare cauliculus
    • n caulis In botany, the stem of a plant.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Caulis the stem of a plant: one of the main stems at the angles of the Corinthian capital
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L., a stem
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. caulis, a stalk.

Usage

In literature:

De myrrha et aloe ponantur in dentem, ubi est vermis: semen caulis, et absinthium, per se vermes interficit.
"Folk-lore of Shakespeare" by Thomas Firminger Thiselton-Dyer
Caulis of fish, 101. veal, 101.
"Hand-Book of Practical Cookery for Ladies and Professional Cooks" by Pierre Blot
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In science:

Presolar graphite is found in two types of spherules classified according to their external morphologies as “onion-like” and “cauliflower-like”.
Silicon carbide absorption features: dust formation in the outflows of extreme carbon stars
The “cauliflower-like” graphite grains also have a concentric shell structure, but it is less well ordered, and is composed primarily of the disordered graphene.
Silicon carbide absorption features: dust formation in the outflows of extreme carbon stars
Whether “onion” and “cauliflower” graphites are formed in the same outflows is not known.
Silicon carbide absorption features: dust formation in the outflows of extreme carbon stars
Whether the “onion” or “cauliflower” grains are more representative of grains in the outflows of extreme carbon stars is not known.
Silicon carbide absorption features: dust formation in the outflows of extreme carbon stars
However, even the most disordered “cauliflowers” or “onion”-cores are still closer to graphite than glassy carbon in structure.
Silicon carbide absorption features: dust formation in the outflows of extreme carbon stars
Supernovae do not explode as spheres, but aspherically in plumes, resembling cauliflower and brocolli more than oranges.
Towards a Synthesis of Core-Collapse Supernova Theory
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