Carronade

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Carronade (Med) A kind of short cannon, formerly in use, designed to throw a large projectile with small velocity, used for the purpose of breaking or smashing in, rather than piercing, the object aimed at, as the side of a ship. It has no trunnions, but is supported on its carriage by a bolt passing through a loop on its under side.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n carronade A short piece of ordnance having a large caliber and a chamber for the powder, like a mortar.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Carronade kar-un-ād′ a short cannon of large bore, first made at Carron in Scotland.
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
From Carron, in Scotland where it was first made

Usage

In literature:

The captain jumped down from the carronade, and hastened to the capstan, without finishing his sentence.
"Peter Simple" by Frederick Marryat
A general discharge from a broadside of carronades, and a heavy volley of muskets from the Portuguese, was the decided answer.
"The Pirate" by Frederick Marryat
Meanwhile Fred, having been deeply impressed with the effect of the shot from the little carronade, succeeded in raising and reloading it.
"The World of Ice" by R.M. Ballantyne
Near to them were two signal-carronades.
"The Floating Light of the Goodwin Sands" by R.M. Ballantyne
We had a carronade in the bow, which we instantly turned on them and discharged.
"The Lonely Island" by R.M. Ballantyne
The big guns sent their balls, and the carronades their showers of grape, into the very midst of the Frenchmen.
"The Rival Crusoes" by W.H.G. Kingston
McDonough's vessels had only carronades.
"Diary in America, Series One" by Frederick Marryat (AKA Captain Marryat)
When the breeze fell, Gascoyne went forward, and, seating himself on a forecastle carronade, appeared to fall into a deep reverie.
"Gascoyne, the Sandal-Wood Trader" by R.M. Ballantyne
Especially did they object to exchange any of their long guns for carronades.
"How Britannia Came to Rule the Waves" by W.H.G. Kingston
The British seamen plied the enemy with their carronades with still greater energy.
"The Story of Nelson" by W.H.G. Kingston
I was much exhausted, and sat down on the breech of a carronade to rest and recover my stunned and scattered faculties.
"Freaks on the Fells" by R.M. Ballantyne
Soon the men at the bows began to fire the carronades in reply to the American cannon.
"Strange Stories from History for Young People" by George Cary Eggleston
The British seamen plied the enemy with their carronades with still greater energy.
"The Grateful Indian" by W.H.G. Kingston
Battery 8, sixty yards from Battery 7; one brass carronade, next Carroll's and Adair's commands.
"The Battle of New Orleans" by Zachary F. Smith
At present they have only sixty pieces of cannon and seventy-one carronades.
"Travels in Peru, on the Coast, in the Sierra, Across the Cordilleras and the Andes, into the Primeval Forests" by J. J. von Tschudi
They look like peaceful merchantmen, with four carronades and a long gun aboard!
"Howard Pyle's Book of Pirates" by Howard I. Pyle
The carronade, now a wholly obsolete arm, was a short cannon, made extremely light in proportion to the weight of the ball thrown by it.
"Admiral Farragut" by A. T. Mahan
A general discharge from a broadside of carronades, and a heavy volley of muskets from the Portuguese, was the decided answer.
"The Pirate and The Three Cutters" by Frederick Marryat
Then the English, who had retreated to their forecastle, unmasked a carronade which they had had time to turn upon their enemy.
"Captain Paul" by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
For artillery he had some 6-pounders and a 32-pounder carronade.
"The Boys of 1812 and Other Naval Heroes" by James Russell Soley
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In poetry:

He answers with a growling throat;
Out leaps his rusty blade,
And one dull, echoing thunder-note
Bounds from the carronade.
"A Dream Of Romance" by Maurice Thompson
The Caroline was a cruiser craft;
Rochon had raked her fore and aft,
With cannon and with carronade,
And had boarded her with pike and blade,
Had pillaged and sunk her; only the mate
Was left to tell of his vessel's fate.
"Old Rochon" by Maurice Thompson