Camisards

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n.pl Camisards kam′is-ar the insurgent Huguenots of the Cevennes, so called from the camise or blouse worn by the peasants.
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Usage

In literature:

Pont de Montvert, or Greenhill Bridge, as we might say at home, is a place memorable in the story of the Camisards.
"Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes" by Robert Louis Stevenson
Thence the Camisards proceeded to Cayla and Vauvert, into which they entered, destroying the fortifications.
"Massacres Of The South (1551-1815)" by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
Thence the Camisards proceeded to Cayla and Vauvert, into which they entered, destroying the fortifications.
"Celebrated Crimes, Complete" by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
He was a leader amongst the Camisards.
"Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1" by The Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D.
The Catholic peasants called them Camisards, the origin of which name has never been clearly ascertained.
"A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times Volume V. of VI." by Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot
CAVALIER, JEAN, leader of the CAMISARDS (q. v.), born at Ribaute, in the dep.
"The Nuttall Encyclopaedia" by Edited by Rev. James Wood
The slaughter of the Camisards, shut up in their burning tower, is a tale of horror still in the countryside.
"France and the Republic" by William Henry Hurlbert
Pont de Montvert, or Greenhill Bridge, as we might say at home, is a place memorable in the story of the Camisards.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition" by Robert Louis Stevenson
It is not exactly known how or when the insurgents were first called Camisards.
"The Huguenots in France" by Samuel Smiles
The Camisards defied for years the army sent against them.
"The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 92, June, 1865" by Various
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