Calenture

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Calenture (Med) A name formerly given to various fevers occuring in tropics; esp. to a form of furious delirium accompanied by fever, among sailors, which sometimes led the affected person to imagine the sea to be a green field, and to throw himself into it.
    • v. i Calenture To see as in the delirium of one affected with calenture. "Hath fed on pageants floating through the air
      Or calentures in depths of limpid flood."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n calenture A kind of delirium sometimes caused, especially within the tropics, by exposure to excessive heat, particularly on board ship.
    • n calenture Figuratively, fever; burning passion or zeal; heat: as, the “calenture of primitive devotion,” ; “the calentures of baneful lust,”
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Calenture kal′en-tūr a kind of fever or delirium occurring on board ship in hot climates.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. calenture, fr. Sp. calenture, heat, fever, fr. calentar, to heat, fr. p. pr. of L. calere to be warm,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. and Sp.—L. calent-em, calēre, to be hot.

Usage

In literature:

In this distress we had, besides the terror of the storm, one of our men die of the calenture, and one man and the boy washed overboard.
"The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe" by Daniel Defoe
I hope in God it may be as safe from calentures and fevers.
"Westward Ho!" by Charles Kingsley
The ailment was influenza, and he called it a calenture.
"The Path of the King" by John Buchan
The senses warred upon the wit; seized by calenture, one saw through radiant mists.
"The Whirlpool" by George Gissing
In this distress, we had, besides the terror of the storm, one of our men died of the calenture, and one man and a boy washed overboard.
"The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe Of York, Mariner, Vol. 1" by Daniel Defoe
This day likewise, I had a stroke of the sun, which occasioned a burning fever or calenture.
"A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. IV." by Robert Kerr
In this distress we had, besides the terror of the storm, one of our men die of the calenture, and one man and the boy washed overboard.
"The Children's Hour, v 5. Stories From Seven Old Favorites" by Eva March Tappan
But who will judge a man's constitution by the symptoms of calenture?
"St George's Cross" by H. G. Keene
The sick men recovering from their calentures "were thoroughly revived" by these tales.
"On the Spanish Main" by John Masefield
Such is the passion of the Calenture.
"The Posthumous Works of Thomas De Quincey, Vol. 1 (2 vols)" by Thomas De Quincey
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