Bucentaur

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Bucentaur A fabulous monster, half ox, half man.
    • Bucentaur The state barge of Venice, used by the doge in the ceremony of espousing the Adriatic.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n bucentaur A mythical monster, half man and half bull; a centaur with the body of a bull in place of that of a horse.
    • n bucentaur [capitalized] The state barge of Venice, in which the doge and senate annually on Ascension day performed the ceremonial marriage of the state with the Adriatic, symbolic of the commercial power of the republic.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Bucentaur bōō-sen′tawr a mythical monster half man and half bull: the state barge of Venice used annually on Ascension Day in the ancient ceremony of the marriage of the state with the Adriatic.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Gr. boy^s ox + ke`ntayros centaur
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
It. bucentoro, usually explained as from Gr. bous, an ox, kentauros, a centaur.

Usage

In literature:

The "Bucentaure" and the "Santisima Trinidad" become jammed together a little way ahead.
"The Dynasts" by Thomas Hardy
The joints of the Bucentaur are racked by time and many voyages to the Lido.
"The Bravo" by J. Fenimore Cooper
Ages hence, the plow may trace furrows where the Bucentaur has floated!
"The Water-Witch or, The Skimmer of the Seas" by James Fenimore Cooper
Three great galleys of the Republic, called Bucentaurs, issued from the crowd of smaller craft.
"Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece" by John Addington Symonds
Three great galleys of the Republic, called Bucentaurs, issued from the crowd of smaller craft.
"Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete" by John Symonds
Three great galleys of the republic, called bucentaurs, issued from the crowd of smaller craft.
"New Italian sketches" by John Addington Symonds
His flagship, the "Bucentaure," had been struck and damaged by lightning.
"Famous Sea Fights" by John Richard Hale
So I must beg your Highness to let me enjoy a sight of you in the bucentaur, and not to insist upon my landing this time.
"Beatrice d'Este, Duchess of Milan, 1475-1497" by Julia Mary Cartwright
Why when you only just skimmed her lips as you rode along in the Bucentaur she at once began to rage and storm.
"Weird Tales, Vol. II." by E. T. A. Hoffmann
This was done by casting a precious ring from the state ship, the "Bucentaur," into the Adriatic.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 6" by Various
The sailing of the Bucentaur was one of the ceremonies very dear to the people when Venice was free, when it had its own Government and Doge.
"Rule of the Monk" by Giuseppe Garibaldi
I would rather have seen the Bucentaur than all their other plunder.
"Pencillings by the Way" by N. Parker Willis
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