Brutify

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • v. t Brutify To make like a brute; to make senseless, stupid, or unfeeling; to brutalize. "Any man not quite brutified and void of sense."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • brutify To bring into the condition of a brute; degrade the moral or physical state of; make senseless, stupid, or unfeeling.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Brutify to make brutal, stupid, or uncivilised:—pr.p. brutify′ing; pa.p. brutifīed′
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Quotations

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne
    Nathaniel%20Hawthorne
    “Labor is the curse of the world, and nobody can meddle with it without becoming proportionately brutified.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Brute, + -fy,: cf. F. brutifier,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. brut—L. brutus, dull, irrational.

Usage

In literature:

Many fine intellects among players have been brutified by loses; others, in greater number, have been so by their winnings.
"The Gaming Table: Its Votaries and Victims" by Andrew Steinmetz
And how many have I seen in my time totally brutified by an immoderate thirst after knowledge?
"The Essays of Montaigne, Complete" by Michel de Montaigne
He had moved from barracks to barracks, dragging on his brutifying military life.
"The Fortune of the Rougons" by Emile Zola
O, labor is the curse of the world, and nobody can meddle with it without becoming proportionably brutified!
"Passages From The American Notebooks, Volume 2" by Nathaniel Hawthorne
But you must not think, Pierre, that I am completely brutified by belief.
"Lourdes From the "Three Cities"" by Emile Zola
But you must not think, Pierre, that I am completely brutified by belief.
"The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete Lourdes, Rome and Paris" by Emile Zola
For an hour he lingered in the tavern brutifying himself by listening to the conversation at the tables around him.
"His Masterpiece" by Emile Zola
Henceforward there was no longer fraternity in arms, there was an end to all society, to all ties; the excess of evils had brutified them.
"History of the Expedition to Russia" by Count Philip de Segur
The sensualist has brutified the seraphic nature with which he was endowed.
"Deerbrook" by Harriet Martineau
Five months journeying across the desert seemed almost to have brutified them.
"Travels in Tartary, Thibet, and China During the years 1844-5-6. Volume 1 [of 2]" by Evariste Regis Huc
Does not man, however coarse, however brutified, however craven he may be, fire up with jealousy the moment he loves?
"The Iron Trevet or Jocelyn the Champion" by Eugène Sue
Now, to my belief, drinking would brutify her physically and morally no quicker than tobacco does him.
"Folly as It Flies" by Fanny Fern
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