Bothie

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Bothie Same as Bothy.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n bothie See bothy.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Bothie a humble cottage or hut: a temporary house for men engaged in some common work, esp. the barely furnished quarters provided for farm-servants, generally unmarried men, in the eastern and north-eastern counties of Scotland
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Usage

In literature:

Elspat's course was not directly forward, else she had soon been far from the bothy in which she had left her son.
"Chronicles of the Canongate" by Sir Walter Scott
Flann lay near the opening of this bothie.
"The King of Ireland's Son" by Padraic Colum
The stalls were each in what was supposed to represent by turns a Highland bothie or a cave.
"The Long Vacation" by Charlotte M. Yonge
They travelled a long day's journey in the direction of the mountain Benvoirlich, and slept for the night in a ruinous hut or bothy.
"Rob Roy, Volume 1., Illustrated" by Sir Walter Scott
They travelled a long day's journey in the direction of the mountain Benvoirlich, and slept for the night in a ruinous hut or bothy.
"Rob Roy, Complete, Illustrated" by Sir Walter Scott
When the rest are building their bothies and huts, these have finished preparing their food and drink.
"The Ancient Irish Epic Tale Táin Bó Cúalnge" by Unknown
After this, come scraps of letters, crossed and recrossed, from the Bothie of Toper-na-fuosich.
"The Germ" by Various
Here is a picture of a bothy of to-day that I visited recently.
"Auld Licht Idylls" by J. M. Barrie
So Patsy, trim and slim as your forefinger with a string of red tied about it, sped eastward over the hills to the Bothy of Blairmore.
"Patsy" by S. R. Crockett
The troopers who guarded the bothy were in either the stupid or the uproarious stage of their drink.
"A Daughter of Raasay" by William MacLeod Raine
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