Bog-oak

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Bog-oak trunks of oak embedded in bogs and preserved from decay—of a deep black colour, often used for making ornaments
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Ir. bogach; Gael. bog, soft.

Usage

In literature:

In the bogs trunks of oak and fir are found lying as they fell centuries ago.
"Hero Tales of the Far North" by Jacob A. Riis
Standing beneath it with the oak behind him, he looked straight along the way he had come across the bog and moss.
"The Lost Treasure of Trevlyn" by Evelyn Everett-Green
From what country or countries do the following come: boxwood, rosewood, sandal-wood, cinchona, bog oak, jarrah?
"Commercial Geography" by Jacques W. Redway
From oak dug up from bogs, many pretty black ornaments are now made.
"Stories and Legends of Travel and History, for Children" by Grace Greenwood
The 11 half-right answers are from BOG-OAK, BRIDGET, CASTOR, CHESHIRE CAT, G. E. B., GUY, MARY, M. A. H., OLD MAID, R. W., and VENDREDI.
"A Tangled Tale" by Lewis Carroll
A bog-oak carving represents a typical Irishman driving a "conthrairy pig," which is supposed to stand for Tim Harrington.
"Ireland as It Is" by Robert John Buckley (AKA R.J.B.)
He asked the price of an elaborate specimen of carving in bog-oak.
"Punch - Volume 25 (Jul-Dec 1853)" by Various
The wood has undergone chemical changes, has lost much of its moisture, and often become very hard, as in bog oak.
"The Geological Story of the Isle of Wight" by J. Cecil Hughes
His effigy in coloured bog oak is disposed in a recumbent attitude on an altar-tomb.
"Cathedral Cities of England" by George Gilbert
I'll back your friendship against all the bogs that ever engulphed an oak forest.
"Luttrell Of Arran Complete" by Charles James Lever
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In news:

These sturdy oak half -barrels, still redolent of California cabernet, are generous enough to hold a water lily, a bog plant, and a couple of fish--and cost only $29.
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