Bathybius

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Bathybius (Zoöl) A name given by Prof. Huxley to a gelatinous substance found in mud dredged from the Atlantic and preserved in alcohol. He supposed that it was free living protoplasm, covering a large part of the ocean bed. It is now known that the substance is of chemical, not of organic, origin.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n bathybius A name given by Huxley to masses of so-called animal matter said to have been found covering the sea-bottom at great depths (over 2,000 fathoms), and in such abundance as to form in some places deposits upward of 30 feet in thickness. It was described as consisting of a tenacious, viscid, slimy substance, exhibiting under the microscope a network of granular, mucilaginous matter, which expands and contracts spontaneously, forming a very simple organism, and corresponding in all respects to protoplasm (which see). Embedded in it were calcareous bodies with an organic structure, called discoliths, coccoliths, and coccospheres, which seemed to belong to bathybius as such. The existence of any such living substance is now generally denied.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Bathybius bath-ib′i-us name given to a supposed low form of life at the bottom of some parts of the deep sea.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL., fr. Gr. baqy`s deep + bi`os life
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Formed from Gr. bathys, deep, and bios, life.