Auriga

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Auriga a conspicuous constellation in the northern hemisphere; between Great Bear and Orion at edge of Milky Way
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Auriga (Anat) The Charioteer, or Wagoner, a constellation in the northern hemisphere, situated between Perseus and Gemini. It contains the bright star Capella.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n Auriga A northern constellation containing the splendid star Capella; the Charioteer or Wagoner. It is supposed to represent a charioteer kneeling in his vehicle. He is often represented with a kid on his left shoulder, this being doubtless an ancient constellation-figure coincident in position with the Charioteer.
    • n Auriga [lowercase] [NL.] A name of the fourth lobe of the liver.
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L., charioteer

Usage

In literature:

In January, 1892, a new star was suddenly seen in the constellation Auriga.
"Curiosities of the Sky" by Garrett Serviss
Latitude by b Aurigae 18 degrees 38 minutes 12 seconds.
"Journals of Australian Explorations" by A C and F T Gregory
CAPELLA, a reddish star of the first magnitude in the northern constellation of Auriga.
"The Nuttall Encyclopaedia" by Edited by Rev. James Wood
Auriga is a beautiful and conspicuous constellation.
"A Field Book of the Stars" by William Tyler Olcott
We've reason to doubt they put anyone down on Auriga.
"Operation Haystack" by Frank Patrick Herbert
The lucida of Auriga, and a nautical star.
"The Sailor's Word-Book" by William Henry Smyth
Auriga, its meaning, 188.
"Notes and Queries, Index of Volume 3, January-June, 1851" by Various
This became evident in 1892, when the last conspicuous temporary star appeared in Auriga.
"The Story of the Heavens" by Robert Stawell Ball
Ascending from Auriga through Camelopardus, it stood, July 19, on a line between the Pointers and the Pole, within 8 deg.
"A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century" by Agnes M. (Agnes Mary) Clerke
The first of these, known as Nova Aurigae, or the New Star in the constellation of Auriga, was discovered by Dr. T.D.
"Astronomy of To-day" by Cecil G. Dolmage
This is the sequence of phenomena in beta Aurigae.
"Pleasures of the telescope" by Garrett Serviss
I twas situated in the constellation of Auriga, and was noticed on February 1.
"The Children's Book of Stars" by G.E. Mitton
But the splendid star Capella, in the constellation Auriga, may claim a moment's attention.
"Astronomy with an Opera-glass" by Garrett Putman Serviss
AURIGA (L.), a charioteer.
"Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary (part 4 of 4: S-Z and supplements)" by Various
In 1891-1892 Nova Aurigae made its spectacular appearance and yielded a distinctly double and complex spectrum for more than a month.
"Astronomy" by David Todd
The feet of Auriga are near the Bull's horns.
"Letters on Astronomy" by Denison Olmsted
***

In news:

Give thanks for Auriga the chariot driver.
One of the strangest constellations in the Everett winter heavens is Auriga , the chariot driver with goats on his shoulder.
Senior Editor Michael Bakich takes you inside the constellation Auriga the Charioteer.
You can use the Big Dipper to find the brilliant star Capella in the constellation Auriga the Charioteer.
One of the strangest constellations in the Everett winter heavens is Auriga, the chariot driver with goats on his shoulder.
Menkalinan, the second-brightest star in Auriga, marks the right shoulder.
Also, notice the star Elnath at the southern tip of Auriga.
The American Association of Variable Star Observers' Citizen Sky project promotes a beginner-oriented program to study Epsilon Aurigae.
Earthsky Tonight – February 18, 2010: Epsilon , Auriga's distant and mysterious star.
Amateur observers can make important contributions to the scientific observing campaign focusing on Epsilon Aurigae.
Epsilon Aurigae: mystery star.
Auriga and its mystery star Epsilon are rising in the east as the sun begins to brighten the sky in August.
Epsilon Aurigae : mystery star.
A friend recently confessed that he will only spend money in Minnesota on food of two cuisine categories: Vietnamese soup shops, and Auriga.
***

In science:

As in Figure 5 for the southern portion of the Taurus-Auriga region.
Low Mass Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Clouds
Infrared color-magnitude diagram for Taurus-Auriga pre-main sequence stars.
Low Mass Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Clouds
Figure 8 illustrates some of the amazing variety of jets among Taurus-Auriga young stars.
Low Mass Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Clouds
The young stars in Taurus-Auriga also drive impressive large-scale mm and cm outflows.
Low Mass Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Clouds
Optical spectrum of RW Aurigae from Kenyon et al. spectrum shows a strong red continuum from a late-type star along with a weak blue continuum and strong emission lines from a hotter, optically thick source.
Low Mass Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Clouds
The spectrum of RW Aurigae is distinct from most T Tauri stars.
Low Mass Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Clouds
Long-term monitoring of near-IR variability in the brightest Taurus-Auriga sources would provide a context for interpreting the variations in the more famous sources such as T Tau, L1551 IRS5, and Haro 6-10.
Low Mass Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Clouds
As in other regions of Taurus-Auriga, H2O ices and CO/CO2 ices are detected along various sightlines through the cloud.
Low Mass Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Clouds
VY Tau is an exceptional PMS star in the Taurus-Auriga dark clouds.
Low Mass Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Clouds
As with many of the Class I sources in Taurus-Auriga, the evolutionary status of the L1527 IRS protostar in unclear.
Low Mass Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Clouds
Circumstellar Dust Disks in Taurus-Auriga: The Submillimeter Perspective.
Forming Planetesimals in Solar and Extrasolar Nebulae
Italy constructed the only two ultracryogenic bar antennae that ever went into operation: Nautilus and Auriga, showed in figures 5.1 and 5.2, respectively.
The Past, Present and Future of the Resonant-Mass Gravitational Wave Detectors
Power spectral density of the Auriga detector operating a 4.5 K, using a two stage low noise dc-SQUID amplifier.
The Past, Present and Future of the Resonant-Mass Gravitational Wave Detectors
The dominating noise source is the electrical resonator thermal noise (sky blue curve) except at the resonances, where the antenna thermal noise dominates (courtesy of the Auriga collaboration).
The Past, Present and Future of the Resonant-Mass Gravitational Wave Detectors
The short breaks occurring every two weeks come from the ordinary cryogenic operations (liquid helium refill) (courtesy of the Auriga collaboration).
The Past, Present and Future of the Resonant-Mass Gravitational Wave Detectors
***