Ashler

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Ashler (Masonry) Hewn or squared stone; also, masonry made of squared or hewn stone.
    • Ashler (Masonry) In the United States especially, a thin facing of squared and dressed stone upon a wall of rubble or brick.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n ashler A block of building-stone, rough as it is brought from the quarry; such stones collectively.
    • n ashler In masonry, a squared stone, as distinguished from a stone which is of irregular shape; such stones collectively.
    • n ashler Masonry constructed of ashler. When the courses are not regular, but broken up by the use of stones of different thicknesses, it is called broken ashler or random-range ashler. Small ashler employs stones of less than one foot in breadth. Bastard ashler is an ashler face backed with rubble or other inferior work, as in all courses but the lowest in the cut. Ashler is said to be plane when it is smoothed on the exposed face; tooled proper, when the tooling is in grooves; random-tooled, when cut without regularity; chiseled or boasted, when wrought with a narrow tool; pointed, when wrought with a tool still narrower; rusticated, or quarry-faced, when the joints only are hewn, the face of the stone being left irregular; prison rustic, when pitted into deep holes; herring-bone, when tooled obliquely in alternate directions; and nigged, when dressed with a pointed hammer.
    • n ashler In carpentry, studding or furring used to cut off the angle at the floor in a garret, so that the room inclosed will have a vertical wall of some height.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Ashler ash′lėr hewn or squared stone used in facing a wall, as distinguished from rough, as it comes from the quarry—also in Ash′lar-work, as opposed to Rubble-work
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. ascheler, achiler, OF. aiseler, fr. aiselle, dim. of ais, plank, fr. L. axis, assis, plank, axle. See Axle

Usage

In poetry:

Where the rude torrent's brawling course
Was shagg'd with thorn and tangling sloe,
The ashler buttress braves its force,
And ramparts frown in battled row.
"Cadyow Castle" by Sir Walter Scott