Archon

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Archon (Antiq) One of the chief magistrates in ancient Athens, especially, by preëminence, the first of the nine chief magistrates.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n archon A chief magistrate of some states in ancient Greece, and particularly Athens. After the abolition of the title of king in Attica there was chosen a single archon, who exercised for life essentially royal prerogatives. The term of office was afterward reduced to ten years, and in 683 b. c. it was made annual, and the duties of the archonship were distributed among nine persons. The first was the archōn epōnymos (name-giving archon), whose functions were executive and judicial, and whose name was given in official acts, etc., to the year of his service; the second was the archōn basileus (archon king), whose duties were chiefly religious and ceremonial; the third was the archōn polemarchos (archon generalissimo), who was, first in fact and then nominally, commander of the military power; and the remaining six were the thesmothetœ, or administrators of justice, whose most important duty it was to pass carefully in review, each year, the whole body of laws of the state, in order to make sure that no errors or contradictions had crept in, that repealed laws had been duly canceled, and that repetition was avoided. It rested with the thesmothetæ, also, to see that all the laws of the republic that were in vigor were strictly enforced, and to bring to trial any public official who had failed in his trust. At the end of their year of office, all the archons, unless they were found guilty of malfeasance, by virtue of their office entered the council of the Areopagus.
    • n archon In the Byzantine empire: One of a number of great court officers.
    • n archon A title assumed by the Frankish barons who established themselves in Greece after the fourth crusade, in the thirteenth century.
    • n archon In modern Greece, a person in authority, as a magistrate, a presiding officer of some societies, etc.
    • n archon Any ruler or governor.
    • n archon In various Gnostic systems, one of several spiritual powers superior to angels, believed to be the rulers of the several heavens. According to Basilides, the great archon is the highest cosmical power and the creator of the ogdoad or ethereal world, having below him the archon who created and rules the hebdomad or lower planetary heaven. See archontic, hebdomad, and ogdoad.
    • n archon In zoology, the human animal; man, as a member of the group Archontia.
    • n archon In entomology: A genus of lepidopterous insects.
    • n archon A genus of coleopterous insects.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Archon ärk′on one of nine chief magistrates of ancient Athens
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. archon, Gr. , , ruler, chief magistrate, p. pr. of to be first, to rule
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. arch-ein, to be first, to rule.

Usage

In literature:

Oils, as I am a Christian, and close to the very palace of the Archon!
"Gycia" by Lewis Morris
The administration of justice was distributed among the nine archons, each one of whom administered some particular department.
"History of Human Society" by Frank W. Blackmar
I would sooner wed a shepherd than an archon, did he but bring with him the riches of true affection.
"The Scrap Book. Volume 1, No. 2" by Various
They have brought the corpse of Perseus the archon.
"A Struggle for Rome, Vol. 2 (of 3)" by Felix Dahn
We charge the Archon Johannes with the care of Ravenna.
"A Struggle for Rome, v. 3" by Felix Dahn
She demands a divorce from the archon; but her husband's love is not dead and he returns penitent to her side.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 6" by Various
This, reasonable in the 5th, is preposterous in the 7th century, when the archon was unquestionably the supreme executive official.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 6" by Various
Possession of common property, at least in some cases, and an archon (supervisor) and treasurer elected for this special case.
"The Origin of the Family Private Property and the State" by Frederick Engels
Socrates is sitting in the porch of the King Archon, when Euthyphro comes up and enters into conversation with the philosopher.
"Custom and Myth" by Andrew Lang
ARCHONS (aer'konz), the chief magistrates of ancient Athens, chosen to superintend civil and religious concerns.
"The New Gresham Encyclopedia. Vol. 1 Part 2" by Various
The popular assembly was ill-organized and probably summoned by the archons themselves.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 4" by Various
It was composed of ex-archons.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 5" by Various
Arrian spent a considerable portion of his time at Athens, where he was archon 147-148.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 6" by Various
Medon was archon of Athens.
"A Philosophical Dictionary, Volume 6 (of 10)" by François-Marie Arouet (AKA Voltaire)
Archons of Athens, topped by the tettix, see, I return!
"Browning and the Dramatic Monologue" by S. S. Curry
Let me remind you what the Archon did.
"The Law and the Poor" by Edward Abbott Parry
The three senior archons.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 12, Slice 5" by Various
Period of archons for life, taken from the family of Codrus, thirteen of whom ruled; 1068-752.
"A Manual of Ancient History" by A. H. L. (Arnold Hermann Ludwig) Heeren
He was called the king, and was one of the nine Archons.
"Ruins of Ancient Cities (Vol. I of II)" by Charles Bucke
But Archon, the son of Amoebichus, and Pelecus, the son of Udames, wrote me.
"The History of Antiquity, Vol. III (of VI)" by Max Duncker
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In news:

Litespeed Archon Wins Eurobike Award.
FRIEDRICHSHAFEN, Germany (BRAIN)–Eurobike awarded Litespeed's Archon with a Silver Design Award at its annual design competition.
Caminiti, Evan Night of The Archon West Winds Three Lobed Recordings.
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In science:

Arc and Archon are federated searching services based on the OAI-PMH; they focus on the process of building a unified search interface over heterogeneous collections.
A Scalable Architecture for Harvest-Based Digital Libraries - The ODU/Southampton Experiments
Both Archon and CiteBase implement a cross-archive search interface; Archon focuses more on harvesting heterogeneous collections and builds an interactive search interface based on harvested metadata, and CiteBase concentrates on automatic reference extraction.
A Scalable Architecture for Harvest-Based Digital Libraries - The ODU/Southampton Experiments
We implemented two prototypes for cross-linking between Archon and CiteBase (Figure 6).
A Scalable Architecture for Harvest-Based Digital Libraries - The ODU/Southampton Experiments
By this method Archon harvests citation data from CiteBase, APS, CERN and other sources, it then builds a cross archive linking service such as a citation in APS may lead to document in CiteBase and vice-versa.
A Scalable Architecture for Harvest-Based Digital Libraries - The ODU/Southampton Experiments
Archon: An OAI-compliant federated physics digital library. http: //archon.cs.odu.edu.
A Scalable Architecture for Harvest-Based Digital Libraries - The ODU/Southampton Experiments
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