Antilegomena

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n. pl Antilegomena (Eccl) Certain books of the New Testament which were for a time not universally received, but which are now considered canonical. These are the Epistle to the Hebrews, the Epistles of James and Jude, the second Epistle of Peter, the second and third Epistles of John, and the Revelation. The undisputed books are called the Homologoumena.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • antilegomena Literally, things spoken against; specifically, those books of the New Testament whose inspiration was not universally acknowledged by the early church, although they were ultimately admitted into the canon. These are the Epistle to the Hebrews, the Epistles of James and Jude, the Second Epistle of Peter, the Second and Third Epistles of John, and the Revelation. They are classed by Roman Catholic theologians as deuterocanonical (which see).
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n.pl Antilegomena an-ti-leg-om′en-a a term applied to those books of the New Testament not at first accepted by the whole Christian Church, but ultimately admitted into the Canon—the seven books of 2 Peter, James, Jude, Hebrews, 2 and 3 John, and the Apocalypse
    • Antilegomena The other books were called Homologoumena, 'agreed to.'
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL., fr. Gr. against + to speak; part. pass.

Usage

In literature:

Antilegomena, 91, 96, seq.
"Companion to the Bible" by E. P. Barrows
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