Anthracene

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Anthracene (Chem) A solid hydrocarbon, C6H4.C2H2.C6H4, which accompanies naphthalene in the last stages of the distillation of coal tar. Its chief use is in the artificial production of alizarin.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n anthracene A hydrocarbon (C14H10) found in coal-tar, and extracted from the last portion of the distillate from this substance by chilling and pressure. It is purified by redistillation, and forms white crystalline laminæ which melt at 415° F. It is of great commercial value, being the base from which artificial alizarin is prepared. See alizarin. Also written anthracin.
    • n anthracene A poisonous ptomaïne obtained from cultures of the anthrax bacillus.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Anthracene an-thra-sēn′ a hydrocarbon obtained as one of the last products in the distillation of coal-tar, of value as the source of artificial alizarin.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Gr. coal
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. anthrax, coal, and -ene.

Usage

In literature:

The amount of pure anthracene obtained is 1/2 lb.
"The Chemistry of Hat Manufacturing" by Watson Smith
Anthracene Yellow C, and 10 lb.
"The Dyeing of Woollen Fabrics" by Franklin Beech
This includes such dyes as logwood, fustic, madder, alizarine, and all the dyes derived from anthracene.
"The Dyeing of Cotton Fabrics" by Franklin Beech
Hard pitch is also always made where as much anthracene as possible is to be obtained.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 5" by Various
C. (5) Anthracene oil, from 270 deg.
"Coal" by Raphael Meldola
C. On exposure to sunlight a solution of anthracene in benzene or xylene deposits para-anthracene (C14H10)2, which melts at 244 deg.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 2" by Various
Anthracene was obtained from alizarine, and, after much labour, alizarine was prepared from anthracene.
"Heroes of Science" by M. M. Pattison Muir
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In science:

Self-consistent I(n) and A(n) are computed in each layer n of 10-layer films of prototypical organics on a metal. The depth dependence of I(n) is discussed at surfaces of anthracene, C60 and PTCDA. The shape contribution can be substantial, up to 0.5 eV, and comes primarily from charge-quadrupole interactions.
Ionization potentials of crystalline organic thin films: Position dependence due to molecular shape and charge redistribution
Pentacene or anthracene films with ab surfaces or rubrene films have intermediate anisotropy, while hetoroatoms in sexithiophene again increase the anisotropy.
Ionization potentials of crystalline organic thin films: Position dependence due to molecular shape and charge redistribution
Gas-phase B3LYP potentials at anthracene atoms in a crystal, an ab monolayer and a film of 10 ab layers.
Ionization potentials of crystalline organic thin films: Position dependence due to molecular shape and charge redistribution
Anthracene’s 9-10 shift of 112 meV and monotonic P+(n) in Fig. 3 gives larger BE shifts that are somewhat less than the early estimated difference31 of 200 meV between surface and bulk.
Ionization potentials of crystalline organic thin films: Position dependence due to molecular shape and charge redistribution
On page 702 of this issue3 , a team of scientists from Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies led by Bertram Batlogg has taken a rather novel approach to the problem of engineering superconductivity in an organic material: they have made a transistor from anthracene, tetracene, and pentacene.
Turning insulators into superconductors
The materials in this series are composed of stacks of chains containing three (anthracene) to five (pentacene) benzene rings.
Turning insulators into superconductors
Three key features set apart the experimental observations reported here: 1) dimensionality, 2) doping process, and 3) no superconducting compounds of anthracene, tetracene, and pentacene are known to exist.
Turning insulators into superconductors
What lies behind the superconductivity of organic materials, such as polyacenes (anthracene) and fullerenes (C60 )? A clue might be provided by the electron-phonon coupling–the ‘glue’ that binds electrons into superconducting Cooper pairs.
Turning insulators into superconductors
Hence, based on this trend, one expects anthracene to have the highest transition temperature within the polyacene series studied by the Bell labs group.
Turning insulators into superconductors
Np241 has been studied with anthracene and sodium iodide scintillation counters.
Discovery of Isotopes of the Transuranium Elements with 93 <= Z <= 98
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