Anathema Maranatha

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Anathema Maranatha an expression commonly considered as a highly intensified form of anathema. Maran atha is now considered as a separate sentence, meaning, “Our Lord cometh.”
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Anathema maranatha as in 1 Cor. xvi. 22; maranatha (Syr. māran ethā, 'our Lord hath come') is properly a mere solemn formula of confirmation, like Amen, having no other connection with the antecedent anathema—it is so printed in the Revised Version.—It seems to have been used by the early Christians as a kind of watchword of mutual encouragement and hope. So the words in 1 Cor. xvi. 22 are nearly equivalent to the similar expressions in Phil. iv. 5; Rev. xxii. 20
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
see 1 Cor. xvi. 22
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
The classical Gr. anathēma meant a votive offering set up in a temple, ana, up, tithenai, to place; the anathĕma of the Septuagint and New Testament meant something specially devoted to evil, as in Rom. ix. 3.

Usage

In literature:

To do anything THEY have never done is anathema maranatha.
"Anne Of The Island" by Lucy Maud Montgomery
His opponents were therefore anathema maranatha.
"The Conflict" by David Graham Phillips
Whoso should not join with him in these let him be Anathema Maranatha.
"Ginx's Baby" by Edward Jenkins
Could he help her to become Anathema maranatha among her sister women?
"The Woman Who Did" by Grant Allen
The principles of liberty were the scoff of every grinning courtier, and the Anathema Maranatha of every fawning dean.
"The Works of Whittier, Volume VI (of VII) Old Portraits, Modern Sketches, Personal Sketches and Tributes, Historical Papers" by John Greenleaf Whittier
The principles of liberty were the scoff of every grinning courtier, and the Anathema Maranatha of every fawning dean.
"The Complete Works of Whittier The Standard Library Edition with a linked Index" by John Greenleaf Whittier
The principles of liberty were the scoff of every grinning courtier, and the Anathema Maranatha of every fawning dean.
"Beacon Lights of History, Volume XIII" by John Lord
The smallest lad in the house knows the meaning of all those words except the last two, Anathema Maranatha.
"New Tabernacle Sermons" by Thomas De Witt Talmage
They had rejected his way, which was the only true way, and were, therefore, anathema maranatha.
"William Lloyd Garrison" by Archibald H. Grimke
So anathema to editors, maranatha to publishers of all such hypothetical post-obits!
"The Complete Prose Works of Martin Farquhar Tupper" by Martin Farquhar Tupper
Thou shalt be anathema maranatha!
"Prisoners of Hope" by Mary Johnston
In those days it was Anathema-maranatha; even now it is still the war-slogan of the Assemblies.
"Robert Burns" by Gabriel Setoun
He shall be Anathema Maranatha, for he has shed the blood of the holy and the pure, the chosen of Heaven!
"Historical Romances: Under the Red Robe, Count Hannibal, A Gentleman of France" by Stanley J. Weyman
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