Agraffe

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Agraffe A hook or clasp. "The feather of an ostrich, fastened in her turban by an agraffe set with brilliants."
    • Agraffe A hook, eyelet, or other device by which a piano wire is so held as to limit the vibration.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n agraffe A clasp or hook, used in armor or in ordinary costume, fastening in the same manner as the modern hook and eye, often made into a large and rich ornament by concealing the hook itself beneath a jeweled, engraved, embossed, or enameled plate: as, “an agraffe set with brilliants,” Scott, Ivanhoe. Also agrappe, fermail.
    • n agraffe A device for preventing the vibration of that part of a piano-string which is between the pin and the bridge.
    • n agraffe A small crampiron used by builders.
    • n agraffe An appliance used in operations for harelip to keep the two surfaces of the wound in apposition.
    • n agraffe An iron fastening used to hold in place the cork of a bottle containing champagne or other effervescing wine during the final fermentation.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Agraffe a-graf′ a kind of clasp or hook.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. agrafe, formerly agraffe, OF. agrappe,. See Agrappes
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. agrafe, a clasp—Low L. grappa, Old High Ger. chrapfo (Ger. krappen), a hook.

Usage

In literature:

The opals in the silver agraffe were all she wanted.
"Prince Zilah, Complete" by Jules Claretie
The strings passing through holes bored through the little bridges, called agraffes, or studs, turned upward toward the wrest-pin.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 385, May 19, 1883" by Various
In Homer the wooers try to gain the favor of Penelope with golden breastpins, agraffes, ear-rings, and chains.
"Museum of Antiquity" by L. W. Yaggy
The bridegroom wore a velvet coat, as nobles did then, with agraffes and fur on it.
"Timar's Two Worlds" by Mór Jókai
But he wrote certain poems, in which Stroom and Graith, and the Agraffe appear.
"The Crow's Nest" by Clarence Day, Jr.
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