Acetic fermentation

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Acetic fermentation a form of oxidation in which alcohol is converted into vinegar or acetic acid by the agency of a specific fungus (Mycoderma aceti) or series of enzymes. The process involves two distinct reactions, in which the oxygen of the air is essential. An intermediate product, acetaldehyde, is formed in the first process.
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Usage

In literature:

The different stages of fermentation are noted scientifically as alcoholic, acetous, and putrefactive.
"Science in the Kitchen." by Mrs. E. E. Kellogg
Instead of burning the seaweed it is fermented in vats producing acetic acid (vinegar).
"Creative Chemistry" by Edwin E. Slosson
This fruit, and the strawberry, are especially suitable for invalids, as they do not engender acetous fermentation in the stomach.
"Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 462" by Various
Amongst the various instances of acetous fermentation, that of bread is usually classed.
"Conversations on Chemistry, V. 1-2" by Jane Marcet
Can the beginning vinous or acetous fermentation of the aliment in weak stomachs contribute to this effect?
"Zoonomia, Vol. II" by Erasmus Darwin
A few minutes now, and the acetous fermentation will begin, and the whole result be spoiled.
"Household Papers and Stories" by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The types of fermentation taking place in the stomach are alcoholic, lactic, butyric, acetic, formic, oxalic, and cellulose.
"Dietetics for Nurses" by Fairfax T. Proudfit
The qualities sold were generally colourless, and were probably the result of acetic fermentation of rice.
"The Preparation of Plantation Rubber" by Sidney Morgan
It is medicinally superior to gum acacia, as it does not undergo acetous fermentation.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 12, Slice 6" by Various
Unhopped ale, having no bitter principle, would easily run into acetous fermentation.
"Nooks and Corners of English Life, Past and Present" by John Timbs
In practice these sugars ferment to lactic, acetic, and other acids which cause "sour" liquors.
"Animal Proteins" by Hugh Garner Bennett
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